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  • Different Clear Coating Technique

    I've been doing a lot of reading, and catching up on the new paints and methods that House Of Kolor has, so that I can re-familiarize myself with their stuff. The Paint Industry has changed a lot since my last paint job, so I needed to catch up. Anyway, in my research, I stumbled upon a method that HOK recommends for the best Distinctness Of Image (DOI) from their clear coats. DOI is getting your paint as close to a mirror as possible. The more distinct the image, the closer you are. Now it seems to be a lot more work, and maybe more paint, but for the best DOI possible, it's what I'm going to try on the TA this time around.

    Normally we spray our base coat, then apply the clear in multiple coats. Let it dry, then color sand and polish. That's still fine, and works well in most cases. HOK recommends to lay the base, apply 2-3 coats of clear. Sand with 800, then spray on 3 more coats, (over-reduced) then color sand and buff. Now since I'm laying on some graphics, I'll be doing that after I sand flat the first stage of clear with the 800 grit. Once my graphics are sprayed, and the mask removed, the final layering of clear goes on. Then the next day I sand. What I like to do is allow the clear to cure for a week from that point. After you cut that gloss, it seems to cure a bit quicker. Then do all of my polishing.

    I've bought enough extra clear to be able to do this, since I was going to do 5-6 coats anyway. I didn't plan on the extra sanding, but I think it's going to work well. Especially since I'm laying graphics, and would rather mask a cured clear coat than the basecoat, or an intercoat clear.

    Now this is not something you're going to want to do to a everyday driver, but for a Lawn Chair Event car, it probably is. We will see. I'm looking to get the deepest black paint that I've ever seen. So I'm anxious to get this started soon.
    -Mike

    This is not something you buy. It's Something you Build!

  • #2
    So I tested this little trick on some motorcycle parts that I painted for a friend. It turned out pretty nice. Because they were plastic parts, I didn't go crazy with the sanding, but I flattened it out pretty good. Over=reduced the clear, and did 2 coats. Slick as glass now. No need to cut & polish. This method will come in handy on those sections that you just can't get a polisher into. Door jams and tight areas. To be honest, I didn't really use that much more clear. It's like laying n extra coat. Since most of us would do 4+ coats anyway it's about the same thing, just some sanding in between.

    I'll be testing this a bit more this week on the TA as I get more painting done on it.
    -Mike

    This is not something you buy. It's Something you Build!

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    • #3
      this is an excellent method. And believe it or not it actually makes the final cut and buff a lot less of a hassle to not have to start with a lower grit and step up into the highers. When I do it this way after the 800 then recoat I can usually start with a 1500 and work into 3000 fairly quick and fight a lot less orange peel. which means a lot less of a chance of cutting through the clear. Thanks Mike
      sigpic
      1967 326 firebird
      http://airefxairbrush.webstarts.com/
      Keep your hands outta my pocket and yer nose outta my business and we'll get along just fine

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      • #4
        That's exactly how this is working out. Making the pain if color sanding a lot less of a pain. I really didn't use much more clear than I thought I would either.

        yours truly,
        The Lord of Hardcore
        -Mike

        This is not something you buy. It's Something you Build!

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        • #5
          I used to shoot 2 coats wetsand with 1000 shoot 2 more and do the cut and buff with 1k, 1200, 1500, 2k, 2500 which I still do on lower end projects but for stuff that's gonna hit the shows I use this method. 3 coats hit it w/ 800 then 3-4 coats over reduced and then usually there is very little peel and can usually start at 1500 and occasionally 2k then 2500 and 3k and hit it with just wizards final cut after letting it cure for a few days. Which decreases the odds of burn thru. I really like this method for darker colors that are more prone to show swirl marks. And it sounds like a lot more work than it is so I can charge more $$$$$$$
          sigpic
          1967 326 firebird
          http://airefxairbrush.webstarts.com/
          Keep your hands outta my pocket and yer nose outta my business and we'll get along just fine

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          • #6
            It should be noted that I am having solvent pop issues on some of my parts. Over reducing clear can cause these issues, but I think it's more a problem with using a medium reducer as opposed to a slower drying one. The temps have been all ****ed up around here, so it's made painting a major pain in the ass. High humidity has cause my paint to flash too fast, not releasing the solvents, causing solvent pop. Funny how it's just on a few of the smaller parts though. They were painted at a different time than everything else though, so whatever. You don't see the solvent pop until you start color sanding, then it sticks out like a soar thumb. From now on, I'm only going to paint cars white.
            -Mike

            This is not something you buy. It's Something you Build!

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            • #7
              Try a longer window between coats. Instead of 1/2 hr it may take an hr to an hr 15 for it to flash out completely because of the humidity and temp
              sigpic
              1967 326 firebird
              http://airefxairbrush.webstarts.com/
              Keep your hands outta my pocket and yer nose outta my business and we'll get along just fine

              Comment


              • #8
                Time between coats wasn't the issue. It was just too hot for my reducer, I guess. I switched to HOK RU313 Very Slow Reducer, and it made a world of difference in flow out. Flash time is a lot longer between coats, but this shit lays flat as **** now. LOL! Solvent pop is non-existant. I guess I'll start going by heat index rather than just the temp. At the time of spraying, I could have used the RU312 slow reducer, but now it's hot enough that the slower shit is required. My plans were to paint in 70 degree weather originally, but that didn't happen. The respray on the solvent pop pieces turned out sweet. Even with temps in the upper 90's. Dealing with temperature is the biggest pain in the ass around here when it comes to painting. I don't really want to stock 3 different types of reducers every time I paint something, but it does cost me less in the long run if I do, I guess.
                -Mike

                This is not something you buy. It's Something you Build!

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                • #9
                  How long are you guy's waiting before hitting it with 800

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                  • #10
                    Would depend on the clear and the climate. but HOK is usually 24 hours.
                    -Mike

                    This is not something you buy. It's Something you Build!

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                    • #11
                      By what percentage is the clear "over reduced"

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